Pushing Pause on Our Reactions by Erin Egloff

It’s no secret that Americans are divided on many topics of critical importance and that they often feel very passionately about their perspectives. While it’s a show of character to have strong principles, it’s a sign of wisdom to be able to think critically instead of reacting impulsively and dismissively. Throughout my life I’ve foundContinue reading “Pushing Pause on Our Reactions by Erin Egloff”

Everyday People Working Against Gender-Based Wage Discrimination by Erin Egloff

Close your eyes and take a moment to let your mind play Everyday People by Sly & The Family Stone. (If you don’t know Sly or his family, we won’t judge you, but do visit YouTube and listen to the song; you’ll be glad you did.) I am everyday people. These three women are alsoContinue reading “Everyday People Working Against Gender-Based Wage Discrimination by Erin Egloff”

I’m White and I Screw Up a Lot by Erin Egloff

Recently, in a discussion on anti-racist action, I listened to a woman share her experiences and frustrations with white people “committing” to anti-racist work and then, after a certain period, abandoning the work to shift their attentions elsewhere. She reminded our group of an essential fact: people of color don’t have the option to ignoreContinue reading “I’m White and I Screw Up a Lot by Erin Egloff”

Mental Illness: The Scapegoat of Mass Shootings | by Erin Egloff

Let’s start off with some actual facts (as opposed to the ever popular “alternative” facts): 1) A public mass shooting is defined by the U.S. Congressional Research Service as a situation where four or more people, excluding the perpetrator, are indiscriminately killed. 2) American discourse and media analysis after mass shootings generally focuses on possible gun control legislation. Weapons that can fire multipleContinue reading “Mental Illness: The Scapegoat of Mass Shootings | by Erin Egloff”